President of the World Peace Council calls for strengthening solidarity with the Palestinian people and condemns the latest massacre

[Português] For the end of the massacre of the Palestinian people and of the Israeli leadership’s impunity; for a Free Palestine, now! In a provocative, irresponsible measure that goes against all of the democratic and progressive forces’ efforts for a fair political solution to the situation in Palestine – where a people faces heroically one […]

In a provocative, irresponsible measure that goes against all of the democratic and progressive forces’ efforts for a fair political solution to the situation in Palestine – where a people faces heroically one century of colonization and five decades of Israeli military occupation – the US opened up its Embassy in Jerusalem on the 14th of May, as ordered by President Donald Trump.

The unilateral step is a blatant violation of international law and of UN resolutions. Hence, only the US has arbitrarily recognized the historical city, which Israel occupied and illegitimately annexed by force, as this country’s capital, running over the principles put forth in successive negotiations for the conflict’s solution, one which would have a shared Jerusalem.

With fair reason, Palestinians have responded with intense protest, to which the Israeli occupation forces reacted with the usual brutality. The Israeli armed forces’ attacks have already killed at least 55 people and wounded thousands this Monday, the 14th, alone. The US provocation of establishing its Embassy in Jerusalem and the Palestinians’ massacre by the Israeli armed forces constitute a revolting affront to all the peace-loving peoples.

For over one month the Palestinians have been protesting, especially in the Gaza Strip, against colonialism and occupation, reaffirming the Palestinian refugees’ right of return, after 70 years in exile, of dispossession and genocide. Since then, the Israeli forces have been shooting to kill unarmed demonstrators and journalists reporting on the protests, alleging that they are protecting the borders. There are over 100 fatal victims during this round of protests.

The UN estimates that around 70% of Gaza’s population is comprised of refugees from the villages destroyed or occupied by Israel during its creation, seven decades ago. On the 15th of May, a day after Israel celebrates its establishment, the Palestinians mark the Nakba, the catastrophe, the genocide, the massacre of 15,000 people, the destruction of over 500 villages and the expulsion of 750,000 people that became refugees (a population today estimated at around five and seven million people scattered throughout the world).

We must reaffirm, with renewed vehemence, the complete rejection of the persistent colonization and military occupation of Palestine by Israel. While we denounce, with indignation, another episode of Israel’s massacre of the Palestinian people, we do not loose sight of the fact that this is a strategy of the Zionist aggressive, racist and criminal leadership of that country, which persecutes even those who inside Israel dare to oppose such a genocidal policy.

As the World Peace Council has repeatedly done, we express, therefore, our unwavering solidarity with the Palestinian people and all the peace forces that, in Palestine, in Israel and all over the world, struggle for a just solution to the question of Palestine.

We reaffirm the urgency of the two-state solution that the Zionist policy and the imperialist complicity try to bury, fulfilling the Palestinian people’s right of self-determination and the establishment of the State of Palestine within the pre-1967 borders, with East Jerusalem as its capital; for the refugees’ right of return and for the liberation of over 6,000 Palestinian political prisoners in the occupation’s cells!

We demand accountability for the Israeli leadership for the persistent crimes against humanity perpetrated against the Palestinian people, beginning with the apartheid regime itself, going through the systematic and grave violations of the Palestinian people’s human rights.

For an end to the siege of the Gaza Strip and of the Israeli repression!

For an end to the Zionist colonization and the Israeli military occupation of Palestine, now!

Long live a Free Palestine!

Socorro Gomes
President of the World Peace Council
15th of May 2018

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via President of the World Peace Council calls for strengthening solidarity with the Palestinian people and condemns the latest massacre — Centro Brasileiro de Solidariedade aos Povos e Luta pela Paz

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Newswire : Poor People’s Campaign launches six weeks of protests around U.S. — Greene County Democrat

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Poor Peoples Campaign demonstration in Washington D. C.

Activists converged on state capitals around the U.S. on Monday to begin six weeks of non-violent protests calling for new programs to help the millions of Americans who live in poverty, an overhaul of voting rights laws and other social change.
Reports by police from seven state capitols and Washington, D.C., showed more than 200 people had been arrested or cited during the first day of the so-called Poor People’s Campaign. In many instances, police said protesters were cited for blocking traffic. In Washington, the two leaders of the campaign were among the protesters arrested outside the U.S. Capitol. Campaign leaders said the protests would cover 35 states.
A statement from the campaign said the Rev. William Barber and the Rev. Liz Theoharis, its two co-chairmen, were among those arrested outside the U.S. Capitol for standing in the middle of a street. Police had no immediate confirmation of arrests there or a specific number of those stopped.
“We’re living in an impoverished democracy,” Barber said. “People across the country are standing up against the lie of scarcity. We know that in the richest country in the world, there is no reason for children to go hungry, for the sick to be denied health care and for citizens to have their votes suppressed. Both parties have to be challenged — one for what it does and one for what it doesn’t do.”
Barber is a North Carolina minister and former president of the state NAACP chapter. Theoharis is co-director of the Kairos Center for Religions, Rights, and Social Justice in New York.
In Alabama, twelve (12) people were arrested for blocking thec street in front of the State Capitol in Montgomery.
In Missouri, 88 people were issued summonses in Jefferson City for obstructing a lawful police order to move after they blocked a downtown street. Police in Raleigh, North Carolina, led off 49 people after they walked out into the street in front of the legislative building, held hands and refused to depart until each was taken away and cited.
Officers cited 10 protesters at the Iowa Capitol who gathered in and around the staff offices of Gov. Kim Reynolds when they refused to leave the building at the close of business hours.
The campaign cast the protests as a “reignition” of the Poor People’s Campaign, the 1968 movement started by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and others to challenge racism, poverty and militarism. According to the campaign, protesters will spend the next 40 days engaged in nonviolent action, including the mobilization of voters and holding teach-ins.
The first teach-in is scheduled for Tuesday in Washington. It is to feature Marian Wright Edelman, president of the Children’s Defense Fund and a part of the 1968 campaign.

 

By Associated Press Poor Peoples Campaign demonstration in Washington D. C. Activists converged on state capitals around the U.S. on Monday to begin six weeks of non-violent protests calling for new programs to help the millions of Americans who live in poverty, an overhaul of voting rights laws and other social change. Reports by police […]

via Newswire : Poor People’s Campaign launches six weeks of protests around U.S. — Greene County Democrat

Thousands march in South Africa over Gaza killings

 

Thousands march in South Africa over Gaza killings

Source: https://www.aa.com.tr/en/africa/thousands-march-in-south-africa-over-gaza-killings/1146729

By Hassan Isilow

JOHANNESBURG

Thousands of South Africans on Tuesday marched to condemn the killings of Palestinians by Israeli security forces at Gaza border.

“We are coming here to condemn and express our anger at the Israel apartheid regime,” Mohammad Desai of Boycott Divestment & Sanctions group (BDS) told a large crowd in Cape Town.

According to the Palestinian Health Ministry, at least 60 Palestinian demonstrators have been martyred and thousands more injured by cross-border Israeli gunfire in one of the deadliest single day massacres in the country’s history.

Desai said Palestinians stood with South Africans during the struggle against apartheid and gave them resources to fight the white minority rule. He said South Africans has all the rights to reciprocate the support.

“The UN has failed us all; resolution after resolution, Israel ignores them. It’s time now for an International solidarity movement to stand up against the atrocious Israeli regime,” deputy secretary general of the ruling African National Congress (ANC), Jessie Duarte, told local TV eNCA.

Another march was held outside the U.S. consulate in Johannesburg to condemn the relocation of the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem.

The embassy relocation coincides with the 70th anniversary of Israel’s establishment in 1948 — an event Palestinians refer to as the “Nakba” or the “The Catastrophe”.

Duarte said Israel is “currently perpetuating inhumane action against Palestinian people and it must stop.”

Photos published on social media showed protesters carrying a coffin draped in Palestinian flag to show their condemnation of the killing of Palestinians.

In a statement on Monday, the South African government condemned the killing of protesters in the Gaza Strip.

On Monday, the South African government ordered the immediate recall of its ambassador to Israel, Sisa Ngobane, following the fatal violence perpetrated by Israel troops in Palestine.

Israel has not yet responded in kind.

Thousands of Palestinians staged mass rallies on the Gaza Strip’s eastern border on Monday to commemorate the Nakba anniversary and protest the relocation of the U.S. embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

 

Source: https://www.aa.com.tr/en/africa/thousands-march-in-south-africa-over-gaza-killings/1146729

Is the U.S. Meddling in Nicaragua?

 

For the past decade, the United States has been quietly assisting opposition groups in Nicaragua, helping them organize resistance to the country’s popular leftist president Daniel Ortega.

U.S. officials hope the country’s opposition groups will create a new political movement that can defeat Ortega at the polls or pressure him into stepping down from power. They fear that without their support, Ortega’s opposition will remain weak and divided, making it impossible for anyone to mount a successful political campaign against the Nicaraguan president.

“Our assistance programs are primarily directed at civil society, in order to limit engagement with the central government,” State Department official Juan Gonzalez told Congress in September 2016.

The assistance programs appear to be having some effect, especially now that opposition groups are leading majorprotests against the Nicaraguan government. After the Nicaraguan government passed a number of mild reforms to the country’s social security program in April, Ortega’s opponents organized a series of protests that quickly turned violent.

Observers estimate that as many as 45 people died in the protests.

Since the protests began, U.S. officials have declared their support for the opposition, blaming the Nicaraguan government for the violence. They have not said if any of the protesters have benefited from their assistance.

While questions remain about the extent of U.S. involvement, it is no secret that the United States has historically played a heavy-handed role in Nicaragua. During the early 20th century, U.S. marines occupied the country for two decades. When the marines left in the 1930s, they handed things over to the Somoza family, which ruled Nicaragua with U.S. support from the 1930s to the 1970s.

During the late 1970s, the Sandinistas ousted the U.S.-backed Somoza dictatorship in a popular revolution. Following the revolution, Ortega led a new government that began putting more resources into education and health care, helping to increase literacy and reduce child mortality.

To prevent the revolution from succeeding, U.S. officials directed two major campaigns against the Sandinistas. During the mid-1980s, the Reagan administration organized a terrorist war against Nicaragua, backing counterrevolutionary forces (“contras”) that tried to overthrow the new Nicaraguan government. As the contras waged their campaign of terror, U.S. officials began supporting Ortega’s political opponents, helping them gain political power through the country’s presidential election in 1990.

In the following years, U.S. officials remained closely involved with their political allies. U.S. diplomatic cables published by WikiLeaks reveal that U.S. officials continued working to keeptheir political allies in power while preventing the Sandinistas from regaining political power. Before the presidential election in 2006, U.S. diplomats spearheaded a multi-faceted campaignto steer campaign funds to their political allies while discouraging voters from voting for Ortega.

In spite of these efforts, U.S. meddling was not enough to tilt the presidential election in favor of U.S.-backed candidates. Ortega won, bringing him back into office and providing the Sandinistas with an opportunity to revive their revolution.

U.S. diplomats in Nicaragua were stunned by the result. They called for an intensification of programs to confront Ortega. “We need to take decisive action and well-funded measures to bolster the elements of Nicaraguan society that can best stop him before he lulls the majority of the Nicaraguan people into complacency, or threatens them into silence,” they reported.

In September 2016, U.S. official Marcela Escobari told a congressional committee that U.S.A.I.D. was working with more than 2,000 “young people” and over 60 civil society organizations to help them play a more active role in Nicaraguan politics and society. “These efforts are allowing them to exercise their political muscle and see results,” she said.

It has not always been easy for U.S. officials to mobilize opposition, however. Since returning to power, Ortega has created a number of popular social welfare programs, providing Nicaraguans with free education, free health care, and various home-improvement programs. The programs have been quite effective, raising incomes and significantly reducing poverty.

The programs have also bolstered Ortega’s popularity, especially among the poor.

In September 2016, a report by the Congressional Research Service described Ortega as “the most popular political figure in Nicaragua.”

That same month, State Department official Juan Gonzalez acknowledged that Ortega was supported by the majority of the population, attributing his support to “a lot of the social investments that he has made in the country.”

Regardless, U.S. officials have not abandoned their efforts to remove Ortega from power. While many officials acknowledge that Ortega has maintained favorable economic policies for U.S. investors and businesses, they insist that he is not doing enough.

Earlier this year, U.S. Ambassador to Nicaragua Laura Dogu complained that international investors face too much risk in the country. She said the country’s cheap labor, which she called its “main competitive advantage,” was losing its appeal. “As more activities are done by robots, the cost of labor becomes irrelevant,” she said.

Dogu insisted that the Nicaraguan people must accept sweeping economic reforms if they want their country to remain relevant in the global economy. She called for more vocational training for young people and the introduction of genetically engineered crops into the country. “Nicaragua can choose to capture emerging markets and growth industries… or can chose to be left behind as other countries seize those opportunities,” she said.

But the bigger problem, according to U.S. officials, is that Ortega remains the leader of Nicaragua. As long as he remains president, they fear that they will never be able to move the country in their preferred direction.

They view Ortega as a “relic” of the Cold War, as U.S. Senator Marco Rubio once called him. The time for leftist revolutions in Latin America is over, they believe. And with leftist leaders being driven from officethroughout the region, U.S. officials hope Ortega will be next.

 

More articles by:

Edward Hunt writes about war and empire. He has a PhD in American Studies from the College of William & Mary.


Source: https://www.counterpunch.org/2018/05/10/is-the-u-s-meddling-in-nicaragua/

My white neighbor thought I was breaking into my own apartment. Nineteen cops showed up.

(The current treatment of blacks in the USA mirrors Apartheid South Africa. Blacks were not the ones who stole the land from the native Americans. – JPC)

The place I call home no longer feels safe.

November 18, 2015

Fay Wells is vice president of strategy at a company in California.

(Kyle Monk for The Washington Post)

On Sept. 6, I locked myself out of my apartment in Santa Monica, Calif. I was in a rush to get to my weekly soccer game, so I decided to go enjoy the game and deal with the lock afterward.

A few hours and a visit from a locksmith later, I was inside my apartment and slipping off my shoes when I heard a man’s voice and what sounded like a small dog whimpering outside, near my front window. I imagined a loiterer and opened the door to move him along. I was surprised to see a large dog halfway up the staircase to my door. I stepped back inside, closed the door and locked it.

I heard barking. I approached my front window and loudly asked what was going on. Peering through my blinds, I saw a gun. A man stood at the bottom of the stairs, pointing it at me. I stepped back and heard: “Come outside with your hands up.” I thought: This man has a gun and will kill me if I don’t come outside. At the same time, I thought: I’ve heard this line from policemen in movies. Although he didn’t identify himself, perhaps he’s an officer.

I left my apartment in my socks, shorts and a light jacket, my hands in the air. “What’s going on?” I asked again. Two police officers had guns trained on me. They shouted: “Who’s in there with you? How many of you are there?”

I said it was only me and, hands still raised, slowly descended the stairs, focused on one officer’s eyes and on his pistol. I had never looked down the barrel of a gun or at the face of a man with a loaded weapon pointed at me. In his eyes, I saw fear and anger. I had no idea what was happening, but I saw how it would end: I would be dead in the stairwell outside my apartment, because something about me — a 5-foot-7, 125-pound black woman — frightened this man with a gun. I sat down, trying to look even less threatening, trying to de-escalate. I again asked what was going on. I confirmed there were no pets or people inside.

I told the officers I didn’t want them in my apartment. I said they had no right to be there. They entered anyway. One pulled me, hands behind my back, out to the street. The neighbors were watching. Only then did I notice the ocean of officers. I counted 16. They still hadn’t told me why they’d come.

[I taught my black kids that their elite upbringing would protect them from discrimination. I was wrong.]

Later, I learned that the Santa Monica Police Department had dispatched 19 officers after one of my neighbors reported a burglary at my apartment. It didn’t matter that I told the cops I’d lived there for seven months, told them about the locksmith, offered to show a receipt for his services and my ID. It didn’t matter that I went to Duke, that I have an MBA from Dartmouth, that I’m a vice president of strategy at a multinational corporation. It didn’t matter that I’ve never had so much as a speeding ticket. It didn’t matter that I calmly, continually asked them what was happening. It also didn’t matter that I didn’t match the description of the person they were looking for — my neighbor described me as Hispanic when he called 911. What mattered was that I was a woman of color trying to get into her apartment — in an almost entirely white apartment complex in a mostly white city — and a white man who lived in another building called the cops because he’d never seen me before.

911 call to Santa Monica Police Dept.

On Sept. 6, 2015, a man called the Santa Monica Police Department to report a burglary in his apartment building. This is an excerpt of that call.

After the officers and dog exited my “cleared” apartment, I was allowed back inside to speak with some of them. They asked me why I hadn’t come outside shouting, “I live here.” I told them it didn’t make sense to walk out of my own apartment proclaiming my residence when I didn’t even know what was going on. I also reminded them that they had guns pointed at me. Shouting at anyone with a gun doesn’t seem like a wise decision.

I had so many questions. Why hadn’t they announced themselves? Why had they pointed guns at me? Why had they refused to answer when I asked repeatedly what was going on? Was it protocol to send more than a dozen cops to a suspected burglary? Why hadn’t anyone asked for my ID or accepted it, especially after I’d offered it? If I hadn’t heard the dog, would I have opened the door to a gun in my face? “Maybe,” they answered.

I demanded all of their names and was given few. Some officers simply ignored me when I asked, boldly turning and walking away. Afterward, I saw them talking to neighbors, but they ignored me when I approached them again. A sergeant assured me that he’d personally provide me with all names and badge numbers.

[I’m a cop. If you don’t want to get hurt, don’t challenge me.]

I introduced myself to the reporting neighbor and asked if he was aware of the gravity of his actions — the ocean of armed officers, my life in danger. He stuttered about never having seen me, before snippily asking if I knew mynext-door neighbor. After confirming that I did and questioning him further, he angrily responded, “I’m an attorney, so you can go f— yourself,” and walked away.

I spoke with two of the officers a little while longer, trying to wrap my mind around the magnitude and nature of their response. They wondered: Wouldn’t I want the same response if I’d been the one who called the cops? “Absolutely not,” I told them. I recounted my terror and told them how I imagined it all ending, particularly in light of the recent interactions between police and people of color. One officer admitted that it was complicated but added that people sometimes kill cops for no reason. I was momentarily speechless at this strange justification.

I got no clear answers from the police that night and am still struggling to get them, despite multiple visits, calls and e-mails to the Santa Monica Police Department requesting the names of the officers, their badge numbers, the audio from my neighbor’s call to 911 and the police report. The sergeant didn’t e-mail me the officers’ names as he promised. I was told that the audio of the call requires a subpoena and that the small army of responders, guns drawn, hadn’t merited an official report. I eventually received a list from the SMPD of 17 officers who came to my apartment that night, but the list does not include the names of two officers who handed me their business cards on the scene. I’ve filed an official complaint with internal affairs.

(The department released some of this information to The Washington Post after an editor’s inquiry.)

[Instead of cash reparations, give every black person 5/3 a vote]

To many, the militarization of the police is primarily abstract or painted as occasional. That thinking allows each high-profile incident of aggressive police interaction with people of color — Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Freddie Gray — to be written off as an outlier.

What happened to them did not happen to me, but it easily could have. The SMPD sent 19 armed police officers who refused to answer my questions while violating my rights, privacy and sense of well-being. A wrong move, and I could have been shot. My complaint is not the first against the department this year.This spring, the local branch of the NAACP and other concerned residents met with SMPD to discuss several incidents of aggressive policing against people of color. The NAACP asked SMPD for demographic information on all traffic, public transportation and pedestrian stops; so far, the department has promised to release a report of detailed arrest data next year.

(Kyle Monk for The Washington Post)

The trauma of that night lingers. I can’t un-see the guns, the dog, the officers forcing their way into my apartment, the small army waiting for me outside. Almost daily, I deal with sleeplessness, confusion, anger and fear. I’m frightened when I see large dogs now. I have nightmares of being beaten by white men as they call me the n-word. Every week, I see the man who called 911. He averts his eyes and ignores me.

I’m heartbroken that his careless assessment of me, based on skin color, could endanger my life. I’m heartbroken by the sense of terror I got from people whose job is supposedly to protect me. I’m heartbroken by a system that evades accountability and justifies dangerous behavior. I’m heartbroken that the place I called home no longer feels safe. I’m heartbroken that no matter how many times a story like this is told, it will happen again.

Not long ago, I was walking with a friend to a crowded restaurant when I spotted two cops in line and froze. I tried to figure out how to get around them without having to walk past them. I no longer wanted to eat there, but I didn’t want to ruin my friend’s evening. As we stood in line, 10 or so people back, my eyes stayed on them. I’ve always gone out of my way to avoid generalizations. I imagined that perhaps these two cops were good people, but I couldn’t stop thinking about what the Santa Monica police had done to me. I found a lump in my throat as I tried to separate them from the system that had terrified me. I realized that if I needed help, I didn’t think I could ask them for it.

Editor’s note: The Santa Monica Police Department told The Washington Post that 16 officers were on the scene but later provided a list of 17 names. That list does not match the list of 17 names that was eventually provided to the writer; the total number of names provided by the SMPD is 19. The department also said that it was protocol for this type of call to warrant “a very substantial police response,” and that any failure of officers to provide their names and badge numbers “would be inconsistent with the Department’s protocols and expectations.” There is an open internal affairs inquiry into the writer’s allegations of racially motivated misconduct. After this essay ran online, Police Chief Jacqueline A. Seabrooks released anadditional statement. “The 9-1-1 caller was not wrong for reporting what he believed was an in-progress residential burglary,” she wrote. Ms. Wells is not wrong to feel as she does.”

Source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2015/11/18/my-white-neighbor-thought-i-was-breaking-into-my-own-apartment-nineteen-cops-showed-up/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.aba7ebc69d5a

Open Letter to the People of Iran  from the American People

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Open Letter to the People of Iran  from the American People

Dear Friends,

We, the undersigned, apologize for Donald Trump’s reckless, baseless, and dangerous decision to pull out of the Iran nuclear agreement and we pledge to do everything we can to reverse that decision.

We are ashamed that our government has broken an agreement that was already signed not just by the United States and Iran, but also by France, Britain, Germany, Russia and China, and then approved by the entire UN Security Council in a unanimous vote. We are ashamed that our government has broken a deal that was working, a deal with which Iran was complying, a deal  that was making our entire world safer and could have moved our nations closer towards the path of friendship.

Unlike our president, we believe that a deal is a deal. Unlike our president, we want to resolve the conflicts in the Middle East, not escalate them. Unlike our president, we want our nation’s resources to be dedicated to enriching people’s lives, not enriching the weapons makers. Unlike our president, we want to live in peace and harmony with the people of Iran.

We understand that our nation already has a dreadful history of meddling in the internal affairs of your country. The 1953 coup that overthrew your democratically elected government was unconscionable. So was US support for Iraq’s Saddam Hussein when he invaded Iran in 1980, including selling him material for making chemical weapons that were used against you. The 1988 shooting down of an Iranian civilian airliner, killing all 290 passengers and crew, was unconscionable. So, too, are the decades of covert actions to overthrow your government and the decades of sanctions that have brought such needless suffering to ordinary Iranians.

We understand that the US government has no business interfering in your internal affairs or in the Middle East in general. We should not be selling weapons to nations guilty of gross human rights violations or sending our military to fight in faraway lands. With all the flaws in our own society–from massive inequality and racism to a political system corrupted by monetary influences–we should clean up our own house instead of telling others how to govern themselves.

We will do everything in our power to stop Donald Trump from strangling your economy and taking us to war with you. We will ask the UN to sanction the United States for violating the nuclear agreement. We will urge the Europeans, Russians, and Chinese to keep the deal alive and increase their trade relations. And we will work to rid ourselves of this unscrupulous president and replace him with someone who is trustworthy, moral, and committed to diplomacy.

Please accept our hand in friendship. May the peacemakers prevail over those who sow hatred and discord.

Click this link sign the petition:  https://www.codepink.org/an_apology_to_the_people_of_iran?

The World Peace Council (WPC) condemns the march to growing militarization, a general imperialist war in the Middle East, and the recent provocative missile attack on Syria!

The confirmed missile attack on the evening of Sunday 29 April on a number of Syrian airbases has raised the tension massively in the Middle East.  According to “Tishreen”,  Syrian newspaper, quoted from sources claiming: “The recent attack on the headquarters in Aleppo and Hama provinces started from the British and American bases in northern Jordan, and nine ballistic missiles were fired in the attack”.

Although no country has formally taken responsibility for this act of aggression, the fingers are all pointing to the Israeli military as being behind it.  Just hours before the attack, Mike Pompeo, the new US Secretary of State, was visiting Israel before departing for the Saudi Arabia another warmonger country and advocate of the “New Middle East Plan”, the war of aggression against Iran as a means of changing the balance of forces in the region.

The Trump administration is considering – based on its agreements with Israel and Saudi Arabia – to announce its withdrawal from the JCPOA (Nuclear Deal with Iran) or at least force a renegotiation with additional terms which will be detrimental to the Iranian side.

Israel along with the US administration are fabricating new pretexts with regards to Iran’s nuclear activities, for the above purpose and neglecting the statement of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), made on Tuesday 1 May, that it has no evidence of Iran’s attempt to achieve nuclear weapons.

The WPC believes that unless the plans by the US and its allies in the Middle East are not stopped in their tracks, the Persian Gulf Region and the whole Middle East will be in danger of being engulfed by war and destruction.  The WPC believes that in these critical conditions

it is its duty to call upon the forces of peace internationally to be vigilant and to mobilize public opinion globally against this military adventure directed from any quarters, defending peace in the Middle East.  The escalation of the aggressiveness of US imperialism and its allies will lead to a disaster for the peoples of the Middle East and would plunge the whole region into a generalized war and destruction.  It is our belief that all problems and disputes in the Middle East should be resolved through dialogue and negotiations in the context of the UN Charter and against the imperialist interference.

The WPC calls on all peace loving forces around the world to prioritise a campaign against the imperialist plans in the Middle East, preventing a regional conflict of global dimension.

The WPC believes that the struggle of the Iranian people and of all peoples of the region for peace with social justice and for peoples’ and democratic rights, will be undermined if we are not able to block the destructive policies of the US administration and its allies (e.g. NATO, EU, Israel, Saudi Arabia).  We call on the members and friends of the World Peace Council and all consequent and genuine peace organisations across the world to effectively mobilize public opinion against the start of a new imperialist war in the Middle East.  Our urgent action is vital! Tomorrow will be too late!  Act NOW!

World Peace Council

7th May 2018